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IOP A community website from IOP Publishing

Feynman Lectures 50th anniversary celebration seminar series


Lithography and self-assembly below 10 nm - approaching the atom from the top down

Speaker: Karl Berggren from MIT

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Scanning probe microscopy

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Technology update

Sound control of nanorod ‘molecules’

The assembly and disassembly of nanorods propelled by ultrasound provides an insight into biological motors.

Multiple optical traps economize on laser power

Recycling laser power using an interferometer provides single-molecule biophysicists with multiple optical traps that are stable and less energy intensive than previous approaches.

Optical tweezers grab nanometre-sized objects

Low intensity lasers manipulate objects the size of a virus

Far-field optical imaging goes fluorescent-free

Pump-probe technique beats the diffraction limit of light – without the need for labels

Lab talk

Theory connects scanning tunnelling techniques

Theoretical descriptions of scanning tunnelling potentiometry could extend the scope of the technique to observe the same features as scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Understanding the signal in electrochemical strain microscopy

Novel technique measures ion concentration and diffusion qualitatively.

Mechanical properties of coal on the nanoscale

Novel atomic force microscopy methods probe the properties of coal.

The voltage drop across atoms

Atomic-scale voltage drop imaging can be used to improve nanoelectronics.