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Nanotechnology Discussions podcasts


Electromagnetism at the nanoscale

A podcast celebrating 150 years of Maxwell's equations

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Buyer’s Guide

Scanning probe microscopy

Sponsored by Bruker Nano Surfaces

Bruker’s Inspire™ delivers, for the first time, highest-resolution nanoscale chemical and property mapping combined with radical productivity advances and uncompromised AFM performance. The integrated, self-optimizing system acquires nanoscale infrared absorption and reflection maps at regular AFM imaging speeds, without the limitations of indirect mechanical approaches or added complexity for the user.

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Technology update

Multiple optical traps economize on laser power

Recycling laser power using an interferometer provides single-molecule biophysicists with multiple optical traps that are stable and less energy intensive than previous approaches.

Optical tweezers grab nanometre-sized objects

Low intensity lasers manipulate objects the size of a virus

Far-field optical imaging goes fluorescent-free

Pump-probe technique beats the diffraction limit of light – without the need for labels

Diamond downsizes classical MRI and NMR

Molecular samples detected and imaged at room temperature.

Lab talk

Nanoscale position sensors: spintronics offer a low-cost alternative to optics

Detecting changes in magnetic field for high-speed sensing.

Seeing atoms under viscous conditions

An unexpected route to high-resolution atomic force microscopy

Calibrating the scanning microwave microscope in situ

An easy route to quantitative nanoscale electrical characterisation at GHz frequencies

Improving contact quality in AFM-based electrical measurements

An appropriate loading force is essential in nanoscale electrical characterization by Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy